Grammer Check?

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jon711
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Grammer Check?

Post by jon711 » Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:35 am

Can any one please clarify, my Greek and Latin is not that good. Is it Pegasus's or Pegasi? As the original winged horse was singular, not quite sure on the correct phrasing....

Jon

PS. only asking so that I may look inteligent, when questioned by committee, for the Oulton Week publicity...

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Ed
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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Ed » Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:03 am

After long discussion with humanities/english/classic lecturer in Bristol a few years ago.....my understanding is that both are correct.

If the word is normally used in English and has become part of the English language then adding 's' is quite acceptable as the plural as is the normal English custom.

If word is only used in Latin, you should use the Latin plural.

If you really feel the need to impress others with evidence of your schooling, then always using the Latin seems to work well.

Its just that sometimes it sounds awfully pretentious....

For me.....I would say Pegasi, which in the past I think we have used.

Anyway, must dash....other fora to visit

cheers

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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Ancient Geek » Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:13 am

The Parachute Regiment says it is both singular and plural.
Its (the Parachute Regiment.) owes it Pegasus Insignia to the wife of its first Commander Lady Browning aka Daphne Dumaurier.
But what do they know of the semantics of grammar - however I would not argue with them!
Simples.

Garry R

Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Garry R » Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:27 am

Spelling grammar as grammer is not bad grammar it's just bad spelling!!! BUT definitely no apostrophe between the two esses at the end of the word which would be bad grammar (sub species punctuation!). This is a modern trend which should be outlawed but is seen so often. For example (or as they say in Latin eg.) mince pie's, carrot's and for the Scots, Burn's lunch (which I suppose could be short for "Burn his lunch") etc. Id est, on the basis you are going for the "non-Latin" useage, under the rules of English it should be Pegasuses - quod erat demonstrandum!!!

Does anyone remember parsing and declension at school.........

Nil carborundum illegitimi.

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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Ancient Geek » Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:35 am

So Garry is it "Beat Nik's Cup", "Beat Niks' Cup", or "Beat Niks Cup" Cambridge says it doesn't matter, Bristol doesn't know and Oxford too snotty or drunk to answer!
Simples.

Garry R

Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Garry R » Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:41 am

If you are referring to Beat Nik the boat, then definitely the Cup belonged to Beat Nik and so it should be Beat Nik's Cup. If the boat had been Beat Niks then Beat Niks' Cup. Call it THE Beat Nik Cup and you don't need any apostrophes!!

Garry R

Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Garry R » Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:42 am

But then I dd my PhD in Bristol so what do I know!!

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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Ancient Geek » Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:52 am

It is a cup that Beat Nik (Not the Merlin.) but a Dragon, won rather like America's Cup no THE.
so it is Beat Nik's Cup then?
Simples.

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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Rupert » Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:58 pm

Assuming one Beat Nik and that it belongs to it, then yes.
Pegasus plural would either be Pegasi or Pegasus, I'd have thought. (after all, if it is good enough for sheep...)
But does a mast belonging to a Pegasus become a Pegasus's mast, or a Pegasus' mast? Never been to clear about that rule. And if one mast belongs to 2 boats...no, no, no, must stop...
Rupert

Garry R

Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Garry R » Fri Dec 04, 2009 1:46 pm

Mast belonging to Pegasus is definitley Pegasus'. Rule is - if a singular ends in an S and you want to define the possessive then don't add another S but put the apostophe after the S that was there already!! Hence to be correct we have a Burns' lunch. ie. he was Robbie Burns hence NOT a Burn's or Burns's lunch. Don't get me started on its and it's!! That is the easiest one of all. Only time there is an apostrophe in "it's" is when you are shortening "it is". Never anywhere else. It only confuses because its signifies possessive on its own (!) so folk stuff in an apostrophe (often wherever they fancy). Golden rule is the read it and if you have an apostrophe read it as "it is" and if it doesn't make sense then you are wreong.

For example. It's a lovely day for sailing. It is a lovely day for sailing. Correct.

I was looking for it's mainsail. Expand to "I was looking for it is mainsail". Very obviously wrong so drop the apostrophe. "I was looking for its mainsail" Now it is correct. As someone else here says - simples.

Rant over!!!!! Personal bugbear over!!!!

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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Rupert » Fri Dec 04, 2009 2:22 pm

I have to remember by thinking that none of the other posessives have an ' in them. Her boat, his boat, its boat. Took me years to sort it in my head...
I like the word wreong - it really sounds like it should exist. I tied my camel to the wreong before heading into the cantina. I wreonged the sidedeck of my Firefly while using a belt sander on it. Meaning 1, a small angled post for looping ropes over. Meaning 2, the act of making that really annoying gouge you get when you tilt a sander just a tiny bit and go through a veneer.

Quiet at work today...
Rupert

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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Pat » Fri Dec 04, 2009 2:57 pm

From Wiktionary
Etymology
Latin: Pegasus, the mythical winged horse
Does anyone remember parsing and declension at school.........
pegasus, pegasus, pegasum, pegasi, pegaso, pegaso,
pegasi, pegasi, pegasos, pegasorum, pegasis, pegasis

it's entrenched into the brain as I was forced to do latin O level instead of my first choice - typing.
So what do I do for a living? Type code into a computer - and after thirty years I still can't type without looking at my fingers :)

anyway hence my offerring of Pegasi

Garry R

Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Garry R » Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:20 pm

I do believe that Pegaso is the Latin trademark for a Lidl wetsuit but I don't recall Mr Rollinson ever wearing one of those, but with his boat's (apostrophe in the correct place mind) tendency to contract Loosus hatchii (curable only by liberal applications of Baleus bucketi) it might be a good idea if he donned the appropriate apparel. Sending smoke signals is not necessarily enough to prevent that sinking feeling. Oh, on a short daylength such as this I am looking forward to Clywedog already.

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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Nigel » Fri Dec 04, 2009 7:24 pm

Pat wrote:Quote:
From Wiktionary
Etymology
Latin: Pegasus, the mythical winged horse
Latin? Greek surely - Calibos hunting the herd of winged horses at the well of the moon, Perseus etc.

Would that make the plural Pegasodes or am I thinking of octopus?

on the other hand, it is a name rather than a noun so I would go for Pegasuses also

Nigel

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Re: Grammer Check?

Post by Ancient Geek » Sat Dec 05, 2009 9:42 am

If in doubt the old Mongoose joke surely will help, "Send a mongoose whilst your about it send a dozen"!
Simples.

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