Waterstains on ply

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andrew
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Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 4:31 pm
Location: United Kingdom

Post by andrew » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:06 pm

What is the best way to remove or reduce the impact of waterstaining on ply?
The inside of my Jolly boat was stripped of varnish 10 yrs ago and there has been some condensation falling on the wood.
Has anyone tried steaming?
How far do you have to sand to remove the stain ?
What about a dilute solution of bleach?
Any thoughts greatly appreciated.
Andrew

Garry R
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Post by Garry R » Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:37 pm

Oxalic acid seems to be the answer according to the general advice in the past. ChrisBarlow used it on his Albacoore I recall so he'll be able to advise more fully.

stotty
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Post by stotty » Fri Jun 29, 2007 9:11 am

Stains can also be removed using citric acid/salt solution - suggest using lemon juice and salt first before buying citric acid crystals - which i use for pickling silver soldered copperwork(less ferocious than sulphuric acid!) - the above works well with iron mould stains!
tony s
Mirror, GP14(x2), Seadog, Blandford Nymph, and Pegasus awaiting complete rebuild!

chris
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Post by chris » Fri Jun 29, 2007 10:16 am

Oxalic acid will remove most stains from wood very well. It needs to be bare wood and works best if gently scrubbed in with something like a nylon nail brush (don't use steel wool) . There is a boat product which I think is called Dekclens or something and i have used that effectively.

There are stains and there are stains. Where steel screws have been used and caused a dark black stain, they seem to return several applications needed and may remain a problem. Some stains are mostly dirt dicolouring the wood. I usually start by a gentle scrubbing with jiff well rinsed off. That's probably equivalent to lemon juice but I bet like many strong cleaners it has some oxalic in anyway. Then water stains too

There's plenty on stain removal in the depths of the forum.

Rupert
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Post by Rupert » Fri Jun 29, 2007 12:00 pm

Has anyone ever tried using the stain removers you can buy for getting tomato sauce out of your T shirt?
Rupert

Garry R
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Post by Garry R » Fri Jun 29, 2007 12:41 pm

I think it's a lot easier to wear a pelican bib.

Rupert
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Post by Rupert » Fri Jun 29, 2007 12:45 pm

Ah, just reread what I wrote. In my head the sentence ended "for getting stains out from wood"...
And I'd happily wear a pelican bib, but my daughter is far too grown up for one of them!
Rupert

chris
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Post by chris » Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:37 pm

I have tried several of the stain devil products on wood and other things. They seem very gentle and harmless but I removed very successfully something nastly and sticky from our carpet the other day only to find by the end of the day it has dissolved the rubber underfelt too and left it perished! Not as gentle as they seem perhaps. But actually most of them seem to do what they say on the bottle.

Anyone know if the cleaner called Oxy-action is based on Oxalic acid?
I bet oxalic does feature in many cleaners.

Rupert
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Post by Rupert » Fri Jun 29, 2007 4:59 pm

According to the ads (not the best source of info...) they contain something that creates oxygen bubbles that lift stains...why this should be so I have no idea! Maybe Alan can tell us...
Rupert

chris
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Post by chris » Fri Jun 29, 2007 6:21 pm

I have googled to find that Bar Keepers' Friend (cleaner similar to sugar soap) does contain oxalic acid. I have used it before to clean very mucky wooden things and it is very good. Might be good for boats then.

I expect the oxygen bubbles is nothing more than Bicarb. It can be used for cleaning as it gets under dirt then gives off bubbles to release dirt.

By they way Oxalic is the acid found in Rhubarb. But definately don't use oxalic acid in food. Eating spinach and rhubarb in the same meal is meant to be enough poison to kill....my first wife died through eating poisonous mushrooms, my second wife died because she woun't eat them!!!

alan williams
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Post by alan williams » Sat Jun 30, 2007 12:07 pm

Hi Chris
Oxy what ever product would be against the trade discripions act as bubbles produced from sodium bicarb are CO2. The oxy products may contain substances that when reacted together produce Hydrogen Peroxide a very vigous bleaching agent, that bottled blondes have been using for ever.
Cheers Al

chris
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Post by chris » Sat Jun 30, 2007 2:27 pm

Hi Alan, Yes I thought it was probably co2 not oxygen, - never was much at chemestry!

How are wedding plans?
Cheers

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