Effect of age on a wooden boat

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Rupert
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Re: Effect of age on a wooden boat

Post by Rupert » Tue Sep 02, 2008 8:38 pm

Hmmm...I owned a MK1 for 10 years, and the tanks leaked like sieves, so I'm not convinced it is a deck width induced problem. More to do with the boat flexing agaist a rigid line, I'd have thought. And the tank ply is no thinner than MK 1 deck ply, and better supported, having a front to it. I think I need more convincing.
Rupert

Michael Brigg
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Re: Effect of age on a wooden boat

Post by Michael Brigg » Tue Sep 02, 2008 9:08 pm

More to do with the boat flexing agaist a rigid line
Not convinced by this either although I agree that my Mk1 also needed corks on the inside of the tanks to get through the test. Actually if you bought the flag officer his beer before he measured the quantity of leakage, by the time he'd drained the measuring pot, all the water had leaked back out again! Happy days eh?

If flexing caused the seams to separate would this not occur on all the other stress points like the gunwhales, hog and plate? (And the transom for that matter. I always thought the curved shape of the hull gave sufficient stiffness, with the transom and thwarts and deck timbers combining to prevent twist.

Other factors must include the habit of leaving boats sitting on unsupportive launching trolleys for months on end while full of water and other junk. The tendency also to use the boat as a luggage trailer on the way to meetings. Everything you cant fit in the boot goes in the boat including the trolley.

There was also a vogue in the 80's for "double stacking" boats, in a "69" position (Will the moderator stand for that?) on a single trailer. The boat on the bottom would be carrying maybe 250lbs of extra weight all on the trailer pads under the bilge! The whole of the hull is usually supported while afloat by the water underneath so the relative strain on a bumpy ride from London to Mount's Bay and back is unimaginable and a real tribute to the strength in the hull.

This seems another plausible cause of breakdown in the 50yr old glue and no wonder.
Michael Brigg

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Ed
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Re: Effect of age on a wooden boat

Post by Ed » Wed Sep 03, 2008 8:37 am

Totally agree about the frost!!!

The big killer.

But the difference is that when frost gets into ply the damage is pretty extensive and normally pretty obvious too. You are less likely to put your foot through it as you most probably wouldn't dare put your foot on it in the first place!

But as Rupert says, sometimes the ply can look pretty OK....but still be very brittle.

I suspect this 'may' be caused by dampness and heat, which can damage the ply, but not in so visually obvious way as with frost.

cheers

eib
Ed Bremner
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Garry R

Re: Effect of age on a wooden boat

Post by Garry R » Wed Sep 03, 2008 9:43 am

The repair which had been carried out on Vivette's hull which I then repaired with agba was originally done with ply (a nice looking job I have to admit) BUT it looked good but was all crumbly. I reckon that water had got in and messed up the glues and the wood had crumbled even though nicely covered in varnish. No problems since!! How easy is it to replace the seals in self bailers successfully (the bailers themselves rather than the fitting into the hull)?

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jpa_wfsc
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Re: Effect of age on a wooden boat

Post by jpa_wfsc » Wed Sep 03, 2008 1:34 pm

Garry R wrote: How easy is it to replace the seals in self bailers successfully (the bailers themselves rather than the fitting into the hull)?
Easy, if you can get the seals. Lynall Boats in Cheltenham stock some. There is a rectangular seal sits in a recess, and held in with glue (sikoflex). The 'trap door' closes up against this.

Leaks, however, are most often caused by the trap door not being straight and flat as they easily get dinged floating the boat onto the trolley. Its always best to close them before dinghy launch and recovery!

Regards;

j./
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JB9
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Re: Effect of age on a wooden boat

Post by JB9 » Wed Sep 03, 2008 4:33 pm

These people are very good - http://www.kevinbutler-rigging.com/contact.htm
Email them for seals etc.
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