8ft Sailing Pram

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Dictate
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:38 pm
Location: West Norfolk

8ft Sailing Pram

Post by Dictate » Tue Aug 27, 2013 5:46 pm

I am seeking a small sailing dinghy to navigate low bridges that are denying me the extended sailing that I would like to enjoy in my area in my retirement.
I cannot say that it will be a particularly comfortable exercise but the compensation will be in the freedom acquired.
Funds are limited but the time is available to do some work (please, not a re-build!) on a wooden boat.
Can anyone tempt me with a "suitable case for treatment"?

nward
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Aug 25, 2013 8:31 am

Re: 8ft Sailing Pram

Post by nward » Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:33 pm

hi,
what about a Fairey Duckling?
Nick

phil58490
Posts: 203
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2012 1:23 pm
Location: Kellow, Looe, Cornwall

Re: 8ft Sailing Pram

Post by phil58490 » Tue Aug 27, 2013 7:34 pm

I saw this Peanut on ebay, thought it might fit the bill.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Antique-saili ... 1204757061
Just across the Tamar in South East Cornwall

Solo 4928
Solo 3406
Hit 5 Sold

Dictate
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:38 pm
Location: West Norfolk

Re: 8ft Sailing Pram

Post by Dictate » Tue Aug 27, 2013 8:27 pm

Thanks for suggestions fellas; you have taken me very seriously when I asked to be tempted!
Nick and Phil, both are desirable but will probably be out of my reach. Had already put the Peanut in my "watch" list, more in hope...

roger
Posts: 3026
Joined: Mon Sep 20, 2004 12:08 pm
Location: Frome Somerset UK

Re: 8ft Sailing Pram

Post by roger » Wed Aug 28, 2013 7:50 am

There was one of these up a couple of weeks ago in Cornwall. I was really tempted then. I could be tempted again but the one in one out policy is being strictly enforced.
Hornet 191 Shoestring,
Hornet 595 Demon awaiting restoration
Hornet 610 Final Fling
Hornet 353

Michael Brigg
Posts: 1663
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 7:11 pm
Location: Gosport, UK

Re: 8ft Sailing Pram

Post by Michael Brigg » Wed Aug 28, 2013 2:06 pm

How important is the "Traditional" materials/Wood and Financial bit.

Personally I think you may find this is your best financial option.

http://sailingdinghies.apolloduck.co.uk ... ?id=314627

It needs low maintenance, looks the part for the Broads, is in great condition, and is robust enough for the use you have in mind, (I would think that Peanut given the age and condition, will be in a rather fragile state even after renovation.) It even includes a (Good condition) road trailer and launching trolley. Those alone would usually set you back @ £400

The Cost? I would say the good condition and Sail today status makes it excellent, actually fantastic VFM. Is a For sale, not an Auction, so its not a gamble either. Only problem might be transport. Perhaps for that you might try looking at a "boat delivery." (It is round the corner from me in Hayling Island, and I might have cause to come up to Cambridge in the next few months.)
Michael Brigg

Dictate
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:38 pm
Location: West Norfolk

Re: 8ft Sailing Pram

Post by Dictate » Wed Aug 28, 2013 4:33 pm

Michael, I detect kindness in your reply but we are probably poles apart.
Material? At present I own my first Grp dinghy in over 40 years sailing and have learnt to "stomach" it but never love it.
I do not sail on the broads but on rivers in the west of the county. By the way, what makes you feel that I require a "robust" boat for "my purposes"? What do you think that I am getting up to in my latter years?
I did come across the boat pointed out by you but saw an identical item on e-bay sell for less than £450 including trailer etc etc just a few months ago, so VFM? I don't think so, lovely though she is.
Your offer to assist if possible with collection/delivery is noted with much appreciation!

Michael Brigg
Posts: 1663
Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 7:11 pm
Location: Gosport, UK

Re: 8ft Sailing Pram

Post by Michael Brigg » Wed Aug 28, 2013 10:27 pm

Hi Dictate,

Not so poles apart. Like you I love the soul that wood gives to a boat, but on this site, which entertains a broad church of sailing philosophy and means, I have learned that there is good in all construction materials when used in the right place.

I have a Firefly, an IC, a 14ft National Restricted clinker, (all wood) and 3 racing sculls (2 wood 1 Aluminium, a rare experimental prototype). I love all these boats, mostly as children excepting my Carl Douglas Scull, with whom the relationship is more of a carnal nature. The IC in unblemished cold moulded Sapele will perhaps usurp that position once dressed in a new coat of Varnish. My father sailed an XOD built of wood in 1930's I think, and we repaired the ribs and replaced Keel bolts in our back yard, but our best family days were in the scruffy Fibreglass "Bristol Flyer," a cathedral hull Pilot Dory with a 70hp outboard. Sadly sold a couple of years ago due to lack of space :( (So many memorable nocturnal teenage boat parties to East Head beach!) There was also "No 7" a fibreglass 7ft pram brought by my father from a bankrupt boating lake business, repaired again and again, and like a creaking gate, always functional and forgiving of every insult. My brothers and I were given £75 to get a wrecked Firefly, and restore that as our racing craft, as a lesson in self reliance I guess. (The boys that got all the brand new boats won all the races of course)

So, I have learned to be pragmatic. My own children have enjoyed their best boating moments in the Avon Redcrest, (A classic of its own kind) and often when I see a plastic topper or Skipper 14, making its way to the beach, full of family I reflect that that family is more successful than I am with all my wooden craft waiting for maintenance and stuck on shore.

But the pleasure derived from a wooden boat is a deeply personal one however, and as you note it cannot be denied. Each knot and twist in the grain highlighted by the varnish makes the boat a perfect combination of imperfections.

I can see why that Peanut would appeal. Incidentally I have a "Hasler Peanut," a fibreglass 4ft unsinkable rowing dinghy designed for children age 2-8, (but I is fun to try rowing it myself as well :lol: :lol: )

My concern if I was taking the Peanut sailing dinghy would be the age and condition of the weight bearing bits. You are clearly an experienced sailor and I presume a craftsman as well. The Peanut was designed I would guess with children in mind and as an adult, even a fit and lithe one will be able to put far more stress on the rig than the intended crew. And a well sailed boat will need sufficient strength to cope with your sailing capabilities. You may find yourself frustrated by being unable to go out not because you cant, but because the boat cant cope.

Your original post indicated "extended sailing," and I would hesitate to undertake a prolonged camping trip in a boat that was fragile, however well sailed. (It would be like trying to modify an AC72 Cat to sail on hydrofoils without being allowed to use the proper controls! :) :oops: ) Hence the presumption of a need for a reasonably rugged design. I learned my sailing on the Broads in an anonymous boatyard lug sailed scow (Ruggedly built of Wood admittedly) just like the Fibreglass Emsworth Lugger. There are many of these types of boat around, about 10 or more similar designs around the solent alone and many are wood.

I still think it VFM, and your £450 boat was clearly even better.

I presumed Norfolk Broads because your profile places you in West Norfolk.

Hope this explains things. Good luck with your quest. I would go for a trad Local design Lug Sail Scow. If necessary upgrade to a bigger sail.
Michael Brigg

Dictate
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 28, 2012 12:38 pm
Location: West Norfolk

Re: 8ft Sailing Pram

Post by Dictate » Wed Aug 28, 2013 10:37 pm

Thank you Michael.

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